Honda CB750

Honda CB750 SOHC Repair Manual

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Honda CB750. A MUST for every CB750 owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 1969-1978

Number of pages: 46 pages

Table of contents:

Honda CB750

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice. You will also receive the download link by email along with your receipt.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

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Honda CB750

The Honda CB750 is an air-cooled, transverse, in-line four-cylinder engine motorcycle produced by Honda across various versions for model years 1969–2003 and 2007 with an upright or standard riding posture. It is frequently referred to as the “Original Universal Japanese Motorcycle” (UJM).

Despite the fact that other manufacturers marketed the transverse, overhead camshaft, inline four-cylinder engine configuration and that it had been used in racing engines prior to World War II, Honda popularized the configuration with the CB750, and the layout subsequently became the dominant sport bike engine layout.

The CB750 is a member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Classic Bikes; it was designated one of the “Greatest Motorbikes Ever” by the Discovery Channel; it was included in The Art of the Motorcycle show; and it is housed in the UK National Motor Museum. The 1969 CB750 is one of the 240 Landmarks of Japanese Automotive Technology, according to the Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, Inc.

The Honda CB750 was the first motorbike to be referred to as a “superbike.”

Models

SOHC

Year and model code:
  • 1969 CB750 (6 June), CB750K or CB750K0 (date unknown)
  • 1970 CB750K1 (21 September)
  • 1972 CB750K2 (US 1 March)
  • 1973 CB750K3 (US-only 1 February. K2 elsewhere)
  • 1974 CB750K4 (US/Japan-only, K2 elsewhere)
  • 1975 CB750K5 (US-only, K2/K4 elsewhere), CB750FO, CB750A (Canada-only)
    The 1975 CB750F had a more streamlined look, thanks in part to a 4-into-1 exhaust and cafe style seat with fiberglass rear. Other changes included the use of a rear disc brake and a lighter crankshaft and flywheel.
  • 1976 CB750K6, CB750F1, CB750A
  • 1977 CB750K7, CB750F2, CB750A1
  • 1978 CB750K8 (US-only), CB750F3, CB750A2
Production (rounded figures)

CB750K0 53,400
CB750K1 77,000
CB750K2 63,500
CB750K3 38,000
CB750K4 60,000
CB750K5 35,000
CB750K6 42,000
CB750K7 38,000
CB750K8 39,000
CB750F 15,000
CB750F1 44,000
CB750F2 25,000
CB750F3 18,400
CB750A 4,100
CB750A1 2,300
CB750A2 1,700

Source: Wikipedia