Triumph Daytona 675

Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple R Repair Manual (2006-11)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple. A MUST for every Street Triple owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2006-2011

Number of pages: 535 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple R Repair Manual (2006-11)

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

Paypal Secure checkout


Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple

The Triumph Daytona 675 is a three-cylinder sport bike that was introduced in 2006. It is the smallest of the Triumph triples. Triumph Motorcycles built it to replace their four-cylinder Daytona 650. The 675 proved to be incredibly light, agile, and powerful; with a maximum power output of 128 bhp, it was also quite speedy, and it outperformed the Japanese 600 cc rivals. Triumph discontinued manufacture of the base model Daytona 675 in 2016, citing declining demand for supersport motorcycles and increasingly stringent European emission rules. Triumph produced the higher-spec Triumph Daytona 675R variant until the 2018 model year. Triumph registered a new trademark for the Daytona, fueling speculation of a future version with the new 765 cc engine.

The Triumph Street Triple is a naked or streetfighter motorcycle produced by Triumph Motorcycles that was originally introduced at the end of 2007. The bike is based on the Speed Triple 1050, but it has a retuned inline three cylinder 675 cc engine from the 2006 Daytona 675 sport bike.

675

Following the release of the four-cylinder TT600 in 2000, development of the Triumph Daytona 675 began. Triumph’s first contemporary middleweight sports motorbike, the TT600, failed to compete with Japanese 600 cc supersport bikes. As a result, Triumph chose to produce a bike closer to its historic principles, making the critical technical decision to use a three-cylinder engine rather than a four-cylinder as in the TT600.

Triumph began engineering studies in 2001, shortly after the completion of the comparable three-cylinder-powered Triumph Daytona 955i, to determine weight, engine performance in terms of power and torque. The project advanced to the complete concept phase in March 2002, once the statistics were approved.

The first chassis development was carried out using a chopped Daytona 600 chassis. Triumph shifted the wheelbase, altered the head angle, and altered the tank. This new design outperformed the original Daytona 600, providing a foundation for comparisons with competitors such as the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R and Honda CBR600RR. While engine development was still ongoing, computer-aided chassis development proceeded using the data gathered from these testing.

The Daytona 675’s design development continued, yielding a largely black look based on the Daytona 600. This early design, however, was abandoned because outstanding British designs of the 1960s had “a flowing curving shape – no harsh angular aggressive edges.” One of the engineering team members created a concept picture of the 675 as a naked bike. The styling was inspired on this concept picture as well as that of the previous T595 model. Styling was developed in-house, retaining true to the spirit of prior Triumph designs. Market research groups comprised of various classes of sportbike riders selected the latter type of bike, which was developed and accepted for production.

In May 2003, the newly improved engine was tested on a dynamometer for the first time. Final development swiftly followed, merging styling, engine, and chassis into a prototype. Testing on prototypes began in late 2004.

The Daytona 675 was unveiled at the 2005 NEC International Motorcycle and Scooter Show. Bike, situated in the United Kingdom, was granted an exclusive test ride prior to the official introduction, which impressed the magazine’s test rider. It was dubbed “the best British sportsbike ever” and “perhaps one of the greatest sportsbikes of all time” by the magazine.

Street Triple

A number of spy images and speculative design sketches were published in the motorcycling press in 2007, with one publication recording a road test of the finished Street Triple. Later stories discussed leaked design images of the new bike. On March 6, 2007, a report on the final bike’s presentation to dealers was released, along with a spy video of a test ride.

First generation (2007 – 2011)

In 2007, the Triumph Street Triple was introduced to replace the 600 Speed Four. It had the same design as the present Triumph naked versions, which were launched on the Speed Triple in 2005, with high-level double-barrel silencers, dual circular headlamps, and a dashboard unit positioned on top. The Speed Triple has a standard swingarm rather than a single-sided unit, which is the most noticeable change. Parts of the bike are shared with the Triumph Daytona 675, most notably the frame and swingarm. The Daytona 675’s 675cc triple-cylinder engine has been de-tuned to make it more street friendly and acceptable as a daily rider naked, but it is still strong in the category with 79 kW (106 horsepower) At 11,750 rpm.

Because the Daytona 675 engine has three cylinders, Triumph introduced a new naming scheme rather than adding the displacement to the Speed Triple name, resulting in a completely new model in Triumph history.

The Street Triple R, which was introduced in 2008, has the same engine and chassis as the normal model but features fully adjustable suspension both front and rear, which is shared with the Daytona. The altered rear suspension results in a slightly higher seat height and a sharper rake than the original model. The Triumph 675 Daytona’s front brakes are likewise similar, with a fully radial Nissin system, master cylinder, and calipers. It differed from the normal bike in terms of handlebars, seat, and distinct color schemes, which were matte orange and matte grey.

Source: Wikipedia

Triumph Rocket III / Classic / Touring Repair Manual (2004-17)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Rocket III. A MUST for every Rocket III owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2004 to 2017

Number of pages: 627 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Rocket III / Classic / Touring Repair Manual (2004-17)

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

Triumph Rocket III

Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. produces the Triumph Rocket III, a three-cylinder motorbike. It possessed the greatest displacement engine of any production motorcycle until the advent of the Triumph Rocket 3 at 2,294 cc (140.0 cu in).

The moniker “Rocket III” comes from the 1968 BSA 750cc pushrod triple, which was a badge-engineered version of the original “Triumph Trident.”

Rocket III

The initial model debuted in 2004. This particular model trim is no longer available. The Rocket III Roadster is the only variant that is currently available. This model was named 2004 Bike of the Year by Motorcycle Cruiser magazine, 2004 Cruiser of the Year by Motorcyclist magazine, and 2005 Bike of the Year by Cruising Rider magazine. This replica is the most recent addition to the UK National Motorcycle Museum.

Rocket III Classic

The Classic model, which debuted in 2006, features rider floorboards, variously shaped silencers (mufflers), and ‘pullback’ handlebars. More color options were offered, and the pillion seat was redesigned to be more comfortable.

Triumph employed ‘viral marketing’ to advertise the Rocket III Classic in June 2007 by uploading a well-produced mock production film on YouTube and bike fan websites. The video got over 1.2 million views as of September 2012.

Rocket III Roadster

The 2010 Roadster is the most powerful bike in the Rocket III lineup, with a claimed 163 lbft (221 Nm) torque and 146 bhp (109 kW) power, as well as a dual exhaust, one per side, rather than the previous 2 and 1 configuration. Triumph refers to it as “the ultimate muscular streetfighter.”

Rocket III Tourer

The 2007 Tourer Limited Edition Model was just a Classic Model with factory-installed windscreen, panniers (saddlebags), backrest, and luggage rack, as well as a choice of two-tone color schemes.

Rocket III Touring

Following the debut of the original model in February 2004, Triumph began designing the Rocket III Touring variant in order to target the huge cruiser market, which accounts for 50% of all US motorcycle sales. In addition to a redesigned steel frame and swinging arm construction, the Touring model boasts higher torque at lower revs – 150 lb-ft at 2500 rpm – but less horsepower at the top end – 106 hp (79 kW) @ 6,000 rpm (claimed). Tank-mounted gauges and a scrolling switch on the handlebar to adjust the time and display fuel ranges are among the new features.

The Rocket III’s five-spoke design was changed with billet aluminum slotted wheels, and narrower tyres were selected to assist handling, with a 180/70 x 16 rear tyre to make it easier to suit the customary detachable panniers, as well as a removable windscreen and Kayaba rear shock absorbers. The Rocket III Touring was phased out in 2017.

Source: Wikipedia

Triumph Sprint ST 1999

Triumph Sprint ST/RS Repair Manual (1998-2004)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Sprint RS/ST. A MUST for every Sprint owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: from 1998 to 2004

Number of pages: 410 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Sprint RS

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

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Triumph Sprint ST/RS

Triumph Sprint ST is a sport touring motorcycle produced by Triumph Motorcycles in the United Kingdom between 1999 and 2010. The Sprint ST, which had a 1050cc four-stroke three-cylinder engine, an alloy-beam frame, and a single-sided swingarm, competed strongly in the market against the Honda VFR800. The Sprint ST was replaced by the Triumph Sprint GT in 2010.

955 cc (T695)

The Sprint ST debuted in 1999 as a complete redesign of the previous Sprint 900 (1993–1998), which was fashioned by Rod Scivyer. It utilised the same 955 cc straight-three engine as the contemporaneous Speed Triple and Daytona models, although slightly detuned for better power delivery. The claimed output was 97 bhp (72 kW), which was eventually boosted to 105 bhp (78 kW).

Since its debut in 1999, the model’s look has stayed mostly unaltered. In 2002, an engine overhaul with Lotus help raised performance to 118 bhp (88 kW) at 9100rpm and 100 Nm (74 lbft) of torque at 5100rpm from a smaller engine—the bike weighs 207 kg (456 lb) dry.

Source: Wikipedia

Triumph Daytona 675

Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple Repair Manual (2006-08)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple. A MUST for every Street Triple owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2006-2008

Number of pages: 425 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Daytona 675

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

Paypal Secure checkout


Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple

The Triumph Daytona 675 is a three-cylinder sport bike that was introduced in 2006. It is the smallest of the Triumph triples. Triumph Motorcycles built it to replace their four-cylinder Daytona 650. The 675 proved to be incredibly light, agile, and powerful; with a maximum power output of 128 bhp, it was also quite speedy, and it outperformed the Japanese 600 cc rivals. Triumph discontinued manufacture of the base model Daytona 675 in 2016, citing declining demand for supersport motorcycles and increasingly stringent European emission rules. Triumph produced the higher-spec Triumph Daytona 675R variant until the 2018 model year. Triumph registered a new trademark for the Daytona, fueling speculation of a future version with the new 765 cc engine.

The Triumph Street Triple is a naked or streetfighter motorcycle produced by Triumph Motorcycles that was originally introduced at the end of 2007. The bike is based on the Speed Triple 1050, but it has a retuned inline three cylinder 675 cc engine from the 2006 Daytona 675 sport bike.

675

Following the release of the four-cylinder TT600 in 2000, development of the Triumph Daytona 675 began. Triumph’s first contemporary middleweight sports motorbike, the TT600, failed to compete with Japanese 600 cc supersport bikes. As a result, Triumph chose to produce a bike closer to its historic principles, making the critical technical decision to use a three-cylinder engine rather than a four-cylinder as in the TT600.

Triumph began engineering studies in 2001, shortly after the completion of the comparable three-cylinder-powered Triumph Daytona 955i, to determine weight, engine performance in terms of power and torque. The project advanced to the complete concept phase in March 2002, once the statistics were approved.

The first chassis development was carried out using a chopped Daytona 600 chassis. Triumph shifted the wheelbase, altered the head angle, and altered the tank. This new design outperformed the original Daytona 600, providing a foundation for comparisons with competitors such as the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R and Honda CBR600RR. While engine development was still ongoing, computer-aided chassis development proceeded using the data gathered from these testing.

The Daytona 675’s design development continued, yielding a largely black look based on the Daytona 600. This early design, however, was abandoned because outstanding British designs of the 1960s had “a flowing curving shape – no harsh angular aggressive edges.” One of the engineering team members created a concept picture of the 675 as a naked bike. The styling was inspired on this concept picture as well as that of the previous T595 model. Styling was developed in-house, retaining true to the spirit of prior Triumph designs. Market research groups comprised of various classes of sportbike riders selected the latter type of bike, which was developed and accepted for production.

In May 2003, the newly improved engine was tested on a dynamometer for the first time. Final development swiftly followed, merging styling, engine, and chassis into a prototype. Testing on prototypes began in late 2004.

The Daytona 675 was unveiled at the 2005 NEC International Motorcycle and Scooter Show. Bike, situated in the United Kingdom, was granted an exclusive test ride prior to the official introduction, which impressed the magazine’s test rider. It was dubbed “the best British sportsbike ever” and “perhaps one of the greatest sportsbikes of all time” by the magazine.

Street Triple

A number of spy images and speculative design sketches were published in the motorcycling press in 2007, with one publication recording a road test of the finished Street Triple. Later stories discussed leaked design images of the new bike. On March 6, 2007, a report on the final bike’s presentation to dealers was released, along with a spy video of a test ride.

First generation (2007 – 2011)

In 2007, the Triumph Street Triple was introduced to replace the 600 Speed Four. It had the same design as the present Triumph naked versions, which were launched on the Speed Triple in 2005, with high-level double-barrel silencers, dual circular headlamps, and a dashboard unit positioned on top. The Speed Triple has a standard swingarm rather than a single-sided unit, which is the most noticeable change. Parts of the bike are shared with the Triumph Daytona 675, most notably the frame and swingarm. The Daytona 675’s 675cc triple-cylinder engine has been de-tuned to make it more street friendly and acceptable as a daily rider naked, but it is still strong in the category with 79 kW (106 horsepower) At 11,750 rpm.

Because the Daytona 675 engine has three cylinders, Triumph introduced a new naming scheme rather than adding the displacement to the Speed Triple name, resulting in a completely new model in Triumph history.

The Street Triple R, which was introduced in 2008, has the same engine and chassis as the normal model but features fully adjustable suspension both front and rear, which is shared with the Daytona. The altered rear suspension results in a slightly higher seat height and a sharper rake than the original model. The Triumph 675 Daytona’s front brakes are likewise similar, with a fully radial Nissin system, master cylinder, and calipers. It differed from the normal bike in terms of handlebars, seat, and distinct color schemes, which were matte orange and matte grey.

Source: Wikipedia

Triumph Tiger 1200

Triumph Tiger Explorer XR Series Repair Manual (2016-17)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Tiger Explorer XR Series. A MUST for every Explorer owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2016 and 2017

Number of pages: 750 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Tiger Explorer XR

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

Paypal Secure checkout


Triumph Tiger Explorer XR Series

Triumph Motorcycles developed, engineered, and constructed the new Tiger Explorer family to provide the finest transcontinental adventure motorbike for any adventure rider. Both the XR and XC models are capable of functioning both on and off-road, but the XR series is built and optimized to provide the best on-road experience.

The new Tiger Explorer comes with a slew of technical advancements, with a focus on cutting-edge active technology for superior stability and control. The Explorer XR is a range-entry model with a 1215cc triple engine, which is unusual in the high capacity adventure class and delivers power via a final shaft drive.

These characteristics are as follows:

  • Triumph Semi-active Suspension
  • Corner optimised switchable ABS and Traction Control
  • The introduction of Rider Modes, including a rider programmable mode
  • Hill Hold control

Source: Triumph

Triumph Daytona 675 R / Street Triple R Repair Manual (2013-17)

Triumph Daytona 675 R / Street Triple R Repair Manual (2013-17)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Daytona 675 R / Street Triple R. A MUST for every Street Triple owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2013 to 2017

Number of pages: 697 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Daytona 675

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

Paypal Secure checkout


Triumph Daytona 675 / Street Triple

The Triumph Daytona 675 is a three-cylinder sport bike that was introduced in 2006. It is the smallest of the Triumph triples. Triumph Motorcycles built it to replace their four-cylinder Daytona 650. The 675 proved to be incredibly light, agile, and powerful; with a maximum power output of 128 bhp, it was also quite speedy, and it outperformed the Japanese 600 cc rivals. Triumph discontinued manufacture of the base model Daytona 675 in 2016, citing declining demand for supersport motorcycles and increasingly stringent European emission rules. Triumph produced the higher-spec Triumph Daytona 675R variant until the 2018 model year. Triumph registered a new trademark for the Daytona, fueling speculation of a future version with the new 765 cc engine.

The Triumph Street Triple is a naked or streetfighter motorcycle produced by Triumph Motorcycles that was originally introduced at the end of 2007. The bike is based on the Speed Triple 1050, but it has a retuned inline three cylinder 675 cc engine from the 2006 Daytona 675 sport bike.

675

Following the release of the four-cylinder TT600 in 2000, development of the Triumph Daytona 675 began. Triumph’s first contemporary middleweight sports motorbike, the TT600, failed to compete with Japanese 600 cc supersport bikes. As a result, Triumph chose to produce a bike closer to its historic principles, making the critical technical decision to use a three-cylinder engine rather than a four-cylinder as in the TT600.

Triumph began engineering studies in 2001, shortly after the completion of the comparable three-cylinder-powered Triumph Daytona 955i, to determine weight, engine performance in terms of power and torque. The project advanced to the complete concept phase in March 2002, once the statistics were approved.

The first chassis development was carried out using a chopped Daytona 600 chassis. Triumph shifted the wheelbase, altered the head angle, and altered the tank. This new design outperformed the original Daytona 600, providing a foundation for comparisons with competitors such as the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R and Honda CBR600RR. While engine development was still ongoing, computer-aided chassis development proceeded using the data gathered from these testing.

The Daytona 675’s design development continued, yielding a largely black look based on the Daytona 600. This early design, however, was abandoned because outstanding British designs of the 1960s had “a flowing curving shape – no harsh angular aggressive edges.” One of the engineering team members created a concept picture of the 675 as a naked bike. The styling was inspired on this concept picture as well as that of the previous T595 model. Styling was developed in-house, retaining true to the spirit of prior Triumph designs. Market research groups comprised of various classes of sportbike riders selected the latter type of bike, which was developed and accepted for production.

In May 2003, the newly improved engine was tested on a dynamometer for the first time. Final development swiftly followed, merging styling, engine, and chassis into a prototype. Testing on prototypes began in late 2004.

The Daytona 675 was unveiled at the 2005 NEC International Motorcycle and Scooter Show. Bike, situated in the United Kingdom, was granted an exclusive test ride prior to the official introduction, which impressed the magazine’s test rider. It was dubbed “the best British sportsbike ever” and “perhaps one of the greatest sportsbikes of all time” by the magazine.

The Daytona 675 won the Masterbike Supersport category in 2006 (placing third overall) and again in 2007.

Street Triple

A number of spy images and speculative design sketches were published in the motorcycling press in 2007, with one publication recording a road test of the finished Street Triple. Later stories discussed leaked design images of the new bike. On March 6, 2007, a report on the final bike’s presentation to dealers was released, along with a spy video of a test ride.

Third generation (2013 – 2016)

Triumph redesigned the Street Triple’s chassis in 2013. It contains a new frame unit that is still made of aluminum but has fewer pieces and welds. The caster angle has been reduced from 24,3° to 24,1° (from the previous model). The old tubular sub-frame is being replaced with a new aluminum cast sub-frame assembly. The most noticeable change is a new exhaust situated beneath the engine, which replaced the previous version’s underseat exhaust, shifting the center of mass forwards and down. The bike also has lighter rims installed.

All of these changes made the bike lighter and more nimble; overall weight was lowered by 6 kg, making it the lightest generation of Street Triples. The engine remained identical, but the first gear was made significantly higher by using gear ratios from the Daytona 675. The 675 Street Triple also gets new springs, new brake discs that may be helped by a multi-mode disengageable ABS, a coded key, more room under the saddle, a dashboard enriched with a fuel gauge, an enhanced finish, new mirrors, and a subtle change at the tank’s base.

The Street Triple R now has a red sub-frame, and the caster angle has been reduced from 23,9° to 23,4° (from the previous model). The R variant is distinguished by a 19mm radial master cylinder and radial four piston brake calipers around 310mm discs. Rebound, compression, and preload are all adjustable on the suspension, which has a 41mm inverted fork and a separate reservoir shock. As an alternative, a disconnectable and customizable is offered.

Triumph debuted the Street Triple Rx in February 2015, based on the R model, with the angular seat unit from the Daytona 675, a quick-shifter, and several colors (where the rims are red in any color scheme).

Source: Wikipedia

Triumph Daytona 955i and Speed Triple Service Manual 2002

Triumph Daytona 955i / Speed Triple Repair Manual (2001-06)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Daytona 955i / Speed Triple. A MUST for every Speed Triple owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2001 to 2006

Number of pages: 410 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Daytona 955i and Speed Triple Service Manual 2002

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

Paypal Secure checkout


Triumph Daytona 955i / Speed Triple

Triumph Motorcycles manufactures the Triumph Speed Triple family of motorcycles. The Hinckley Triumph of 1994 was one of the first bikes built in the streetfighter type, which is a modern sport bike or racing replica motorbike that lacks an aerodynamic plastic fairing. The design was popularized by bikers who, after crashing their racing replicas, placed the bikes back on the road without fairings.

955i

Other than aesthetic changes, the Speed Triple changed nothing between 2000 and 2001. The engine control unit was upgraded to the Sagem MC2000. Because the ground block of the 1997-99 bikes was known to fail, the wiring harness for the 2000 and 2001 bikes was modified. Both the Speed Triple and the Daytona became known as 955i bikes (the Daytona adopted the 955i moniker in 1999), clearing up some of the confusion caused by the prior T500 series designations. Other significant distinctions were silver wheels rather than black wheels and the Speed Triple emblem on the rear quarter panel being printed rather than cursive.

Gareth Davies reworked the bodywork in 2002. A revision to the engine casings of the 955i engine lowered weight by approximately 17 pounds, resulting in a 432 lb (196 kg) reduction. A revised cylinder head design resulted in a small improvement in power. The MC2000 control unit was kept, however it was modified to accommodate an O2 sensor.

In late 2004, a small number of Special Edition Speed Triples (Speed Triple SE) with just aesthetic alterations were created.

Nissin brakes might be a concern for all years from 1997 to 2004. Though once lauded as one of the greatest stopping motorcycles, numerous owners have complained of brake sponginess with time. The caliper pistons were not sufficiently covered, allowing dirt, debris, and rust to accumulate. The pistons would become entangled in the caliper seals and be dragged back into the caliper bore. This resulted in an excess of piston travel necessary to impart braking force, resulting in a spongy feel. To correct this, Daytona 675 calipers with a teflon coating might be utilized. A bigger master cylinder can also be used to compensate for the extra distance.

Source: Wikipedia

Triumph Tiger 1200

Triumph Tiger Explorer Repair Manual (2012-16)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Tiger Explorer. A MUST for every Tiger Explorer owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2012 to 2016

Number of pages: 554 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Tiger 1200

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

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Triumph Tiger 1200

The Triumph Tiger Explorer (marketed as the Triumph Tiger 1200 since November 2017) is a dual-sport motorcycle introduced by Triumph Motorcycles during the 2011 EICMA exhibition. There are two models available right now: Tiger Explorer XR Family and Tiger Explorer XC Family. Both versions have identical characteristics, but the XC has a more capable off-road setup, such as spoked wheels rather than aluminum cast wheels. Both are powered by a 1,215 cc (74.1 cu in) straight-three engine with four valves per cylinder and a six-speed transmission with shaft final drive. Triumph claims that the engine generates 135 hp (101 kW) of power and 89 lbft (121 Nm) of torque. ABS, cruise control, and traction control are all standard.

Source: Wikipedia

Triumph Bonneville T100/America/Speedmaster/Thruxton/Scrambler

Triumph Bonneville T100/America/Speedmaster/Thruxton/Scrambler Repair Manual (2001-08)

Complete PDF version of the Service Manual for the Triumph Bonneville T100/America/Speedmaster/Thruxton/Scrambler. A MUST for every Bonneville owner.

Download: Immediately after payment!

OEM Original factory workshop manual.

Models covered by this manual: 2001 to 2008

Number of pages: 482 pages

Table of contents:

Triumph Bonneville T100/America/Speedmaster/Thruxton/Scrambler

This PDF repair manual can be downloaded right after the payment process in complete, on the device of your choice.

We do not offer printed manuals, for the following reasons:

  1. it is more eco-friendly to use a digital version
  2. your manual never gets dirty or greasy
  3. you can always choose to print the specific page(s) you need to work on your bike
  4. you receive your manual immediately after payment
  5. it is searchable

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Triumph Bonneville

The Triumph Bonneville is a standard motorcycle with a parallel-twin four-stroke engine that was produced in three incarnations during three distinct manufacturing cycles.

The first two generations were produced by the now-defunct Triumph Engineering in Meriden, West Midlands, England, from 1959 to 1983 and again from 1985 to 1988.

Triumph Motorcycles in Hinckley, Leicestershire, launched the third series in 2001 and continues to the present as a fully new design that closely follows the previous series.

The name Bonneville is derived from the well-known Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, USA, when Triumph and others sought to break motorcycle speed records.

T100

Triumph introduced the Bonneville 790, the first new Bonneville in 15 years, at the Munich Motorcycle Show in September 2000, featuring a 790 cc (48 cu in) 360° crankshaft parallel-twin engine. The T100 Bonneville, designed by John Mockett and David Stride, was presented as an upgraded version, originally with the 790 cc engine, and from 2005 with the 865 cc engine first seen on the 2004 Thruxton, and fitted to all Bonnevilles beginning in 2007.

The name is derived from Triumph T100 vehicles made between 1939 and the mid 1970s, and it is offered as part of Triumph’s “Modern Classics” collection. The engine has two electrically heated carburetors. Triumph installed an air injection device near the spark plug to meet 2007 emission requirements.

The T100 (together with all Bonneville-based vehicles) was further upgraded in 2008 with fuel injection to satisfy new Euro 3 emissions regulations. In addition to operating cleaner than a carburettor engine, the fuel injected system is also easier to start from cold. To keep the’retro’ look, the fuel injectors are covered beneath throttle bodies that look like carburetors.

For 2017, the T100 model received a slew of improvements, including an increase in displacement to 900cc, the inclusion of liquid cooling, traction control, and a shift from a 360° to 270° crank.

America

The Bonneville America rides substantially differently than the normal Bonneville, with the wheelbase increased 6.4 inches (160 mm) to 65.2 inches (1,660 mm), making it 6.8 inches (170 mm) longer overall. The seat was lowered by 2.2 inches (56 mm), and the steering head rake angle was raised by 4.3 degrees, for a total rake of 33.3 degrees. The America retained the Bonneville’s 12.2-inch (310 mm) front disc, but the front wheel was dropped to 18 inches (460 mm) in diameter, while the rear wheel was reduced to 15 inches (380 mm) in diameter, with a bigger 11.2-inch (280 mm) disc brake. The America also had a bigger petrol tank and a ‘chromed’ plastic console to hold the filler, as well as a 4.5-inch (110 mm) diameter speedometer and warning lights.
To recreate the’retro appearance’ of the air-filter covers from the 1960 Triumph twins, the side panels were extended with sheet-metal coverings over the passenger-peg brackets and perforated chrome fittings behind the carburettors. To produce a ‘cruiser’ riding position, the rider’s footrests were also moved to the front of the engine.

2007

The engine capacity was enlarged to 865 cc (carburated) in 2007, generating peak power of 54 bhp (40 kW) at 6,800 rpm and maximum torque of 69 Nm (51 lbft) at 4,800 rpm. The city fuel economy is around 45 miles per US gallon (5.2 L/100 km; 54 mpg-imp) while the highway fuel economy is roughly 50 miles per US gallon (4.7 L/100 km; 60 mpg-imp). New “reverse cone” chrome silencers, a new design of cast alloy wheels, adjustable clutch and front brake levers, and an all-black engine finish with chromed covers were all part of the upgrade. The chrome chain cover, pillion footrest hanger, and upper fork shrouds have been restyled, and a more comfortable pillion seat has been installed.

2008

The Bonneville America’s UK version was upgraded in 2008 with an electronic fuel injection system to suit European pollution regulations, with the fuel injectors masked by dummy carburetors. The Bonneville America in the United States was not upgraded to EFI until 2009.

Speedmaster

The Triumph Speedmaster, based on the Bonneville America, was introduced in 2003 as a ‘factory bespoke’ cruiser. The original model had a 790 cc (48 cu in) air-cooled DOHC twin engine with a 1,660 mm (65.2 in) wheelbase with the crankshaft set at 270°. The main variations from the Bonneville America featured a black engine finish, shorter gearing, a flat handlebar on risers, a one-piece saddle, and cast alloy wheels with dual front discs instead of the America’s single disc. The moniker ‘Speedmaster’ was last used by American importers for the Bonneville T120R in 1965, but not by Triumph.

The first generation 790 cc (48 cu in) model from 2003–2004 has 53.1 horsepower (39.6 kW) and a peak speed of 166 km/h (103 mph). The engine capacity was enlarged to 865 cc (52.8 cu in) (carburettor-fueled) in 2005, generating peak power at 6,500 rpm and maximum torque of 68 Nm at 3,500 rpm. A multipoint sequential fuel injection model with new design alloy wheels, a restyled chain cover, pillion footrest hanger, and upper fork shrouds, as well as slash cut silencers and four new colour schemes, was introduced in 2007.

The Bonneville Speedmaster, part of Triumph’s ‘Modern Classics’ series, was revived in 2018 as a new Speedmaster nameplate. The 2018 Speedmaster retrofitted the Triumph Bobber Black’s faux-hardtail chassis into a light-duty tourer by adding a bigger fuel tank (3.17 gal. vs. the Bobber’s 2.4 gal.), bigger rider’s seat and pillion seat with passenger foot pegs, ‘beach bar’ handlebars with more retracement, forward controls, chrome exhausts and accents, and a back fender with mounting points for elective saddlebags.

The 2018 Speedmaster, like the Bobber Black, has a ride-by-wire throttle with selectable ‘Rain’ and ‘Road’ modes that modulate throttle response, as well as one-touch cruise control; ABS and traction control; LED lighting with daytime running light; twin front disc brakes with Brembo calipers; upgraded KYB front forks; and larger tires.

Thruxton

The bike is named after the Thruxton Circuit in Hampshire, where Triumph earned the first three positions in the Thruxton 500 mile endurance event in 1969. These races contributed to the emergence of the “café racer” period, in which ordinary production motorbikes were modified to boost street and racing performance.

Scrambler

The Scrambler was conceived as an off-road Bonneville with limited off-road capabilities.

The TR6C Trophy Special was a major influence on the new Scrambler, and the new bike shared many of the same key features, most notably the high level stacked twin exhausts and crossover exhaust headers, though Triumph had to swap sides (from left to right) with the stacked pipes because the battery box interfered with running them on the left side.

The Scrambler also had a high, wide handlebar, a higher seat position, twin chromed Kayaba rear shock absorbers (with increased 106 mm travel), 41 mm Kayaba front forks with 120 mm travel and rubber fork gaiters, a small single headlight with a simple speedo, and chunky, knobbly Bridgestone tyres on the thin 36-spoke 19 x 2.5-inch front wheel and 40-spoke 17.
The Scrambler received a slew of Triumph Factory accessories, including a skid plate to protect the engine’s underside, engine bars, a headlamp grille, number boards for the sides, an optional tachometer on early models (twin side by side speedometer and tachometer became standard beginning with the 2010 model year), a handlebar brace and pad, and even a single seat with a fixed rear luggage rack behind. Arrow’s two-into-one performance exhaust system is a popular aftermarket upgrade.

The engine was an 865 cc parallel twin from the Bonneville (but with the 270° crank from the America/Speedmaster cruiser variants) with dual carburetors, detuned to enhance performance at low engine speeds, with peak output of 54 hp (40 kW) at 7,000 rpm and maximum torque of 69 Nm (51 lbft) at 5,000 rpm. The introduction of multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with SAI in 2008 (2009 in the United States) necessitated the installation of a bigger fuel tank to accommodate the new pump unit. To keep the Scrambler’s antique appearance, throttle bodies were disguised as carburetors.

Source: Wikipedia

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